Broadband Update: FCC Accepting Correction Challenges for New National Broadband Map

On Friday, November 18th the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) unveiled the “pre-production draft” of the new national broadband map. This new map is the most detailed and current federal map of where broadband is and is not accessible throughout the country.

What information is included on the map?
The map displays address-level availability and data (as self-reported by internet service providers) for fixed and mobile broadband as well as data aggregated to larger areas – e.g., state, county, census place, and congressional district. Data can be examined by exploring the map’s digital interface or by searching by state or address. The map also displays coverage data by provider.

How does this affect you and your community?
In cases where the draft broadband map indicates broadband speeds that are not actually being observed at specific locations, it is important to challenge the results being presented on the map. Failure to do so could jeopardize a community’s ability to secure a portion of the more than $42 Billion set aside for broadband expansion under the Broadband Equity Access and Deployment (BEAD) program. Simply put, if the speeds indicated on the map are incorrect for a location and you want to improve local broadband access, it is very important to challenge the results.

How to submit a challenge/ correction:
The FCC is seeking help to improve the data on the map by asking communities and individuals to submit a challenge or request a correction. These are 3 types of challenges: availability challenges, mobile availability challenges, and location challenges. More information on the challenge process can be found on the, How to Use the FCC’s National Broadband Map help page.  

How does this affect you and your community?
In cases where the draft broadband map indicates broadband speeds that are not being observed at specific locations, it is important to challenge the results being presented on the map. Failure to do so could jeopardize a community’s ability to secure a portion of the more than $42 billion set aside for broadband expansion under the Broadband Equity Access and Deployment (BEAD) program.  

Due Date
To ensure valid challenges are incorporated into the map before federal funding allocations are made, the public are encouraged to submit challenges by January 13, 2023.

Source: Public Service Commission of Wisconsin

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